hero image

Registries

National CMV Registries

A registry is a collection of information about people, usually focused around a specific diagnosis or condition. For congenital CMV, two main registries exist that are focused around pregnant women who acquire CMV during pregnancy and children who are born symptomatic with congenital CMV. Sponsored by Virginia Commonwealth University and Baylor College of Medicine, these two registries allow for researchers to observe the incidence of CMV infection while collecting valuable evidence and data about congenital CMV outcomes during pregnancy, childhood, and beyond. Women and families are invited to learn more and participate in these registries on a voluntary basis by reaching out to them online or via email. 

National CMV Registry for Pregnant Women

The purpose of the National Cytomegalovirus Registry for Pregnant Women is to develop a database of nearly all pregnant women in the U.S. who develop a congenital infection during pregnancy. This database will establish the true frequency of this infection nationally, determine the interventions used, monitor the outcomes of live born infants with a congenital CMV infection and provide a specimen repository for investigators. Patient management consultation will be available, if requested by obstetricians. In addition to maternal pregnancy history, the registry maintains medical information for each newborn including therapy, and neurologic and hearing evaluations at birth and at two years of age.

National Congenital CMV Disease Registry

National Congenital CMV Disease Registry is a research program working to learn more about children born with symptoms of congenital CMV disease. This national surveillance program tracks trends over time, identifies risk groups, and lays groundwork for evaluation of future intervention programs. Aside from research, the National Congenital CMV Disease Registry provides an outreach program consisting of a website, written educational material, and an annual newsletter, CMV Updates, for the purpose of educating health care professionals, families, and all others interested in learning more about congenital CMV disease.


Noah - New York

The TORCH screen showed that I had been exposed to a primary infection of the Cytomegalovirus. CMV causes the most damage to babies whose mothers contract it for the first time while pregnant. I never knew that because I had a toddler in daycare, that I was at a greater risk for exposure.

— Lynn, Mother