May 2016

CCMV Public Health and Policy Conference Series: CCMV and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Author: Dr. Megan Pesch In October of 2023, researchers, clinicians, and families from around the world gathered in Salt Lake City, Utah for the Congenital CMV Public Health and Policy Conference. It was an exciting three-and-a-half days-- jam-packed with presentations about the latest clinical practices and research findings, as well as congenital CMV families sharing their experiences and lessons learned from their own journeys. This series highlights some of the presenters and their work featured at the conference, to share with our NCMVF community. In this installment, we learn about the relationship between congenital CMV and Autism Spectrum Disorder.  

Acquired CMV: Risks and Treatments

Acquired CMV infection is when a person is infected with CMV after birth, whether during childhood or adulthood. Acquired CMV is actually very common with anywhere from 50-80% of adults in the United States having been infected with CMV by the time they reach 40 years old. However, acquired CMV can cause serious problems for people who are immunocompromised and those who have weakened immune systems.

Acquired CMV: Intro and Symptoms

If you have been affected by congenital CMV, it’s very possible that someone else in your life has also been affected by CMV, but in a very different way. It could be your grandmother who suffered from CMV complications during chemotherapy treatment to fight cancer. Or maybe a family friend who contracted CMV after a successful transplant surgery.