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​Microcephaly 101

Microcephaly has been making headlines over the last year as potential brain malformation connected to women diagnosed with Zika during pregnancy. However, kids are at risk of being born with microcephaly even in areas of the world not hit by the Zika virus. Many of these cases are caused by cytomegalovirus, or CMV. Unlike Zika, which is only being actively transmitted in a small area of the world, CMV exists virtually everywhere. To reduce these cases, we need to increase awareness of CMV: causes, detection, treatments, etc. 

Pregnant and diagnosed with CMV?

​If you have just recently been diagnosed with CMV, it can be an extremely confusing, difficult time--we've been there. Just trying to understand what the doctors are telling you can leave you feeling lost and alone sometimes. National CMV is here to help guide you as you begin this journey, providing information and resources to better understand what comes next.

After a pregnant friend's CMV diagnosis, a pediatrician takes action

National CMV recently had the chance to speak with Dr. Keren Shahar-Nissan, a pediatrician at Schneider Medical Center of Israel, who has launched a Valacyclovir study in the wake of a friend being diagnosed with CMV infection during her pregnancy. With limited funding and increasing enrollment, Dr. Shahar-Nissan, is hoping for an increased appreciation and enthusiasm towards the prevention of congenital CMV infection. 

Ultrasound detection of congenital CMV infection

Tens of thousands of babies are born in the United States with congenital CMV every year. For many of these babies, possible signs of CMV infection were likely visible during pregnancy on ultrasound.

Dr. Stanley Plotkin talks CMV vaccine research

Dr. Stanley Plotkin has such a storied vaccine development career that one might say he wrote the book on vaccines. In fact, he did and his book “Vaccines”, now in its 6th edition, is the standard medical reference. Dr. Plotkin’s background reads like a roadmap of 20th century infectious disease—polio, rubella, rotavirus, rabies, and varicella (chicken pox). His career has been spent on the development of these vaccines and he now advises and influences clinical practice, academia, vaccine policy, as well as industry. Fortunately, Dr. Plotkin is also the leading advocate for a CMV vaccine and recently spoke with National CMV’s Janelle Greenlee about the status and future of CMV vaccine development.  

Acquired CMV: Risks and Treatments

Acquired CMV infection is when a person is infected with CMV after birth, whether during childhood or adulthood. Acquired CMV is actually very common with anywhere from 50-80% of adults in the United States having been infected with CMV by the time they reach 40 years old. However, acquired CMV can cause serious problems for people who are immunocompromised and those who have weakened immune systems.

Acquired CMV: Intro and Symptoms

If you have been affected by congenital CMV, it’s very possible that someone else in your life has also been affected by CMV, but in a very different way. It could be your grandmother who suffered from CMV complications during chemotherapy treatment to fight cancer. Or maybe a family friend who contracted CMV after a successful transplant surgery.