woman and child picture

Only 9% of women know about CMV

Inform, Engage, & Advocate

2017 CMV Legislation Proposed in Four States

What do Idaho, Iowa, Oregon, and Maine have in common? These states have proposed state CMV legislation for 2017! Thanks to the hard work of sponsors, parents, physicians, and other advocates within these states, CMV legislation with proposed education and/or screening programs will be evaluated during this legislative session in each individual state. So what's in all of these bills? Check out our blog for summaries and links to bill text and updates. Also be sure to follow National CMV on social media for calls to action and other updates. Best of luck to these four states in 2017!


What is CMV?

Cytomegalovirus, commonly referred to as CMV, is a member of the herpesvirus family. It is common and typically harmless to the general population – between 50 and 80 percent of people in the United States have had a CMV infection before the age of 40. Once CMV is in a person’s body, it stays there for life.

CMV is the most common viral infection that infants are born with in the United States. Approximately 1-4 percent of uninfected women have a primary (or first) CMV infection during a pregnancy, and about 40 percent of women who become infected with CMV for the first time during pregnancy pass the virus to their babies.

Prevention

CMV is preventable! Every pregnant woman is at risk for acquiring CMV.

There are simple and effective prevention measures you and your loved ones can take to mitigate the risk of CMV transmission during pregnancy. If you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about CMV.

Congenital CMV

CMV can present a critical problem for babies who are infected with CMV before birth, referred to as congenital CMV.  Roughly 30,000 children are born with congenital CMV each year, and more than 5,000 children suffer from permanent problems.